Wednesday, January 16, 2013

January 2013 Book 1: Annexed by Sharon Dogar




Read comments from your teachers below:

4 comments:

Mrs. Schatz said...

from Mr. B. Wiese

Annexed is the Ann Frank story from the guys perspective. The author did a good job bringing out the feelings and emotionsand struggles of a teenaged boy. There were times in the book I felt a little claustrophobic like the people in the book. Over all I liked the book, think the author did a great job of displaying the emotions and the feelings inside the house. I would recommend this book to be put out in the library.

Melissa Friedewald said...

I read The Diary of Anne Frank in high school, so there weren’t really any surprises in this book for me, but I think knowing what was going to happen in the end was part of what made me want to read this book in the first place. It is both heartbreaking and breathtaking at the same time. The author was able to retell this story flawlessly from her version of Peter’s perspective and conjured up some of the less obvious, but completely believable and understandable, emotions that a teenage boy in those circumstances would have actually felt. While Anne Frank had an amazing understanding of language, loved to talk and question, and was able to always find the right word to express her feelings in her diary, Peter struggled with this, so following him as he worked through the many emotions he was dealing with was like experiencing the same hardships through a different body. It is terribly sad and based fully on actual events, so be aware that while this is a beautiful and great read, it is very serious and quite depressing.

Melissa Friedewald said...

I read The Diary of Anne Frank in high school, so there weren’t really any surprises in this book for me, but I think knowing what was going to happen in the end was part of what made me want to read this book in the first place. It is both heartbreaking and breathtaking at the same time. The author was able to retell this story flawlessly from her version of Peter’s perspective and conjured up some of the less obvious, but completely believable and understandable, emotions that a teenage boy in those circumstances would have actually felt. While Anne Frank had an amazing understanding of language, loved to talk and question, and was able to always find the right word to express her feelings in her diary, Peter struggled with this, so following him as he worked through the many emotions he was dealing with was like experiencing the same hardships through a different body. It is terribly sad and based fully on actual events, so be aware that while this is a beautiful and great read, it is very serious and quite depressing.

Mrs. Schatz said...

I felt this was a wonderful accompanying book to The Diary of Anne Frank. This book tells the same story from Peter's point of view. There are no surprises. I felt the author did an exceptional job of capturing the mood/tension/life/experience through this piece of historical fiction. She did a lot of research. I would suggest offering it to students as an accompanying or alternative to Anne Frank's diary.